A Morte: Cientista Revela Informacoes Ineditas

xxxxx

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/13/opinion/what-our-cells-teach-us-about-a-natural-death.html?mwrsm=Facebook&_r=0

Copia do original

What Our Cells Teach Us About a ‘Natural’ Death

Every Thursday morning on the heart transplant service, our medical team would get a front-row seat to witness an epic battle raging under a microscope. Tiny pieces of heart tissue taken from patients with newly transplanted hearts would be broadcast onto a gigantic screen, showing static images of pink heart cells being attacked by varying amounts of blue immune cells. The more blue cells there were, the more voraciously they were chomping away the pink cells, the more evidence that the patient’s inherently xenophobic immune system was rejecting the foreign, transplanted heart.

MINHA TRADUCAO

Todas as manhas de quinta-feira no servivo de transplante de coracao, nossa equipe medica obtinha um assento na primeria fila para assistir uma batalha epica acontecendo sob um microscopio.

xxxxxxxxxxx

Microsoft:

O que nossas células nos ensinam sobre uma morte ‘Natural’

Todas as manhãs de quinta-feira sobre o serviço de transplante de coração, nossa equipe médica iria obter um assento na primeira fila para assistir a uma batalha épica fúria sob um microscópio. Pequenos pedaços de tecido do coração retirado pacientes com corações recém transplantados iria ser transmitidos em uma tela gigante, mostrando imagens estáticas das células do coração rosa sendo atacadas por quantidades variáveis de células do sistema imunológico azuis. As células mais azuis que havia, mais vorazmente eles estavam mastigando embora as células-de-rosa, a mais evidências de que o sistema do paciente inerentemente xenófobos imunológico estava rejeitando a coração transplantada, estrangeira.

xxxxx

Google

Toda quinta-feira de manhã no serviço de transplante de coração, nossa equipe médica teria um lugar na primeira fila para testemunhar uma batalha épica fúria sob um microscópio. pequenos pedaços de tecido cardíaco retiradas de pacientes com corações recém-transplantados seria transmitido em uma tela gigante, mostrando imagens estáticas de células do coração-de-rosa que está sendo atacado por diferentes quantidades de células do sistema imunológico azuis. As células mais azuis havia, mais vorazmente eles estavam mastigando as células rosa, o mais evidências de que o sistema imunológico inerentemente xenófobo do paciente estava rejeitando o coração estrangeiro, transplantado.

xxxx

There was so much beauty to be found in the infinitesimal push and pull between life and death those slides depicted that I would fantasize about having them framed and put up in my house. Yet the more I studied those cells, the more I realized that they might have the answers to one of the most difficult subjects of our time.

Throughout our history, particularly recently, the human race has looked far and wide to answer a complex question — what is a good death? With so many life-sustaining technologies now able to keep us alive almost indefinitely, many believe that a “natural” death is a good one. With technology now invading almost every aspect of our lives, the desire for a natural death experience mirrors trends noted in how we wish to experience birth, travel and food these days.

When we picture a natural death, we conjure a man or woman lying in bed at home surrounded by loved ones. Taking one’s last breath in one’s own bed, a sight ubiquitous in literature, was the modus operandi for death in ancient times. In the book “Western Attitudes Toward Death,” Philippe Ariès wrote that the deathbed scene was “organized by the dying person himself, who presided over it and knew its protocol” and that it was a public ceremony at which “it was essential that parents, friends and neighbors be present.” While such resplendent representations of death continue to be pervasive in both modern literature and pop culture, they are mostly fiction at best.

Continue reading the main story

This vision of a natural death, however, is limited since it represents how we used to die before the development of modern resuscitative technologies and is merely a reflection of the social and scientific context of the time that death took place in. The desire for “natural” in almost every aspect of modern life represents a revolt against technology — when people say they want a natural death, they are alluding to the end’s being as technology-free as possible. Physicians too use this vocabulary, and frequently when they want to intimate to a family that more medical treatment may be futile, they encourage families to “let nature take its course.”

Yet, defining death by how medically involved it is might be shortsighted. The reason there are no life-sustaining devices in our romantic musings of death is that there just weren’t any available. Furthermore, our narratives of medical technology are derived largely from the outcomes they achieve. When death is unexpectedly averted through the use of drugs, devices or procedures, technology is considered miraculous; when death occurs regardless, its application is considered undignified. Therefore, defining a natural death is important because it forms the basis of what most people will thus consider a good death.

Perhaps we need to observe something even more elemental to understand what death is like when it is stripped bare of social context. Perhaps the answer to what can be considered a truly natural death can be found in the very cells that form the building blocks of all living things, humans included.

Though we have known for more than a century how cells are created, it is only recently that we have discovered how they die. Cells die via three main mechanisms. The ugliest and least elegant form of cell death is necrosis, in which because of either a lack of food or some other toxic injury, cells burst open, releasing their contents into the serums. Necrosis, which occurs in a transplanted heart undergoing rejection, causes a very powerful activation of the body’s immune system. Necrosis, then, is the cellular version of a “bad death.”

The second form of cell death is autophagy, in which the cell turns on itself, changing its defective or redundant components into nutrients, which can be used by other cells. This form of cell death occurs when food supply is limited but not entirely cut off, such as in heart failure.

The most sophisticated form of cell death, however, is unlike the other two types. Apoptosis, a Greek word used to describe falling leaves, is a programmed form of cell death. When a cell becomes old or disrepair sets in, it is nudged, usually by signaling molecules, to undergo a form of controlled self-demolition. Unlike in necrosis, the cell doesn’t burst, doesn’t tax the immune system, but quietly dissolves. Apoptosis is the reason our bone marrow doesn’t weigh two tons or our intestines don’t grow indefinitely.

As important as apoptosis is to death, it is essential for life. While as humans, we often consciously or unconsciously hope to achieve immortality, immortality has a very real existence in the cellular world — it’s called cancer. In fact, most cancers occur because of defects in apoptosis, and most novel cancer therapies are designed to allow cell death to occur as it normally would.

In many ways, therefore, life and death at a cellular level are much more socially conscious than how we interface with these phenomena at a human level. For cells, what is good for the organism is best for the cell. Even though cells are designed entirely to survive, an appropriate death is central to the survival of the organism, which itself has to die in a similar fashion for the sake of the society and ecosystem it inhabits.

We humans spend much of our lives denying death. Death, however, is not the enemy. If there is an enemy, it is the fear that death arouses. The fear of death often induces us to make choices that defy the biological constraints of our existence. Such choices often lead us to a fate that more closely resembles necrosis, involving the futile activation of innumerable resources eventually resulting in a cataclysmic outcome, rather than apoptosis. Furthermore, even as we hope to defy our mortality, our cells show the devastation that can occur for the organism if even one cell among billions achieves immortality.

When I asked Robert Horvitz, the Nobel Prize-winning biologist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who was part of the group that discovered apoptosis, what lessons we could learn from cell death, his answer demonstrated exactly why we have failed to understand death in the context of our lives: “Only once before has someone approached me to discuss the existential questions that might relate what is known about cell death to human existence.”

The question for us, then, is: What is the human equivalent of apoptosis in the context of our society? One way to approach that question is to look at what the human equivalent of necrosis is. To me, if a human being is in the hospital with intensive, life-sustaining therapies such as artificial respiration, nutrition or dialysis sustaining them with little hope of recovering reasonable brain function, such a state could be considered necrosis. Almost any other alternative, whether one dies in the hospital having rescinded resuscitation or intubation (DNR/DNI), at home with hospice services or with the aid of a physician’s prescription, has much more in common with apoptosis.

We have striven endlessly to answer some of our most crucial questions, yet somehow we haven’t tried to find them in the basic machinery of our biology. Apoptosis represents a pure vision of death as it occurs in nature, and that vision is something we might aspire to in our own deaths: A cell never dies in isolation, but in clear view of its peers; it rarely dies of its own volition; a greater force that is in touch with the larger organism understands when a cell is more likely to harm itself and those around it by carrying on. Apoptosis represents the ultimate paradox — for the organism to survive, the cells must die, and they must die well. “There are many disorders in which there is too little apoptotic death,” Dr. Horvitz said, “and in those cases it is activating apoptosis that could increase longevity.”

And finally, a cell also understands better than we humans do the consequences of outlasting one’s welcome. For though humanity aspires to achieve immortality, our cells teach us that a life without death is the most unnatural fate of all.

xxxxxxxxxxx

Traducao pelo Microsoft

O que nossas células nos ensinam sobre uma morte ‘Natural’

Todas as manhãs de quinta-feira sobre o serviço de transplante de coração, nossa equipe médica iria obter um assento na primeira fila para assistir a uma batalha épica fúria sob um microscópio. Pequenos pedaços de tecido do coração retirado pacientes com corações recém transplantados iria ser transmitidos em uma tela gigante, mostrando imagens estáticas das células do coração rosa sendo atacadas por quantidades variáveis de células do sistema imunológico azuis. As células mais azuis que havia, mais vorazmente eles estavam mastigando embora as células-de-rosa, a mais evidências de que o sistema do paciente inerentemente xenófobos imunológico estava rejeitando a coração transplantada, estrangeira.

Havia tanta beleza para ser encontrado no impulso infinitesimal e puxe entre vida e morte os slides retratados que fantasio sobre tê-los enquadrado e acondicionados em minha casa. Ainda mais eu estudei essas células, mais percebia que tenham as respostas a um dos temas mais difíceis do nosso tempo.

Ao longo da nossa história, particularmente recentemente, a raça humana tem olhado longe para responder a uma pergunta complexa — o que é uma boa morte? Com tantas tecnologias sustentam a vida agora é capazes de nos manter vivos quase indefinidamente, muitos acreditam que uma morte “natural” é uma boa. Com tecnologia agora invadindo quase todos os aspectos de nossas vidas, o desejo de uma experiência de morte natural espelha tendências observadas em como desejamos experimentar nascimento, viagens e comida nos dias de hoje.

Quando nós Imagine uma morte natural, podemos invocar um homem ou uma mulher deitada na cama em casa rodeado de entes queridos. Tomar o último suspiro na própria cama, uma visão onipresente na literatura, foi o modus operandi para morte em tempos antigos. No livro “atitudes ocidentais para morte,” Philippe Ariès escreveu que a cena do leito de morte foi “organizada pela pessoa morrendo, que presidiu e sabia que seu protocolo” e que era uma cerimônia pública na qual “era essencial que os pais, amigos e vizinhos estar presente.” Enquanto tais representações resplandecentes da morte continuam a ser difundida na literatura moderna e cultura pop, eles são principalmente de ficção na melhor das hipóteses.

Esta visão de uma morte natural, no entanto, é limitada, desde que ele representa como costumávamos morrer antes do desenvolvimento de tecnologias modernas de cristaloides e é apenas um reflexo do social e contexto científico da época que morte teve lugar em. O desejo de “natural” em quase todos os aspectos da vida moderna representa uma revolta contra a tecnologia — quando as pessoas dizem que querem uma morte natural, eles estão aludindo a extremidade ser como tecnologia-livre quanto possível. Os médicos também usam este vocabulário, e frequentemente quando querem íntima para uma família que mais tratamento pode ser inútil, eles incentivam as famílias para “deixar a natureza seguir seu curso.”

Ainda, a definição de morte como medicamente envolvido é poder ser míope. A razão lá são nenhum dispositivo de manutenção da vida em nossas reflexões romântico da morte é que simplesmente não havia nada disponível. Além disso, nossas narrativas da tecnologia médica são derivados em grande parte os resultados conseguidos. Quando a morte inesperadamente é evitada com o uso de drogas, dispositivos ou procedimentos, tecnologia é considerada milagrosa; Quando a morte ocorre de qualquer maneira, sua aplicação é considerada indigno. Portanto, definir uma morte natural é importante porque forma a base do que a maioria das pessoas, portanto, irá considerar uma boa morte.

Talvez precisamos observar algo ainda mais elementar para entender o que a morte é quando ele é despojado próprias de contexto social. Talvez a resposta para o que pode ser considerado que uma morte verdadeiramente natural pode ser encontrada em muito células que formam os blocos de construção de todos os seres vivos, os seres humanos incluídos.

Embora já há mais de um século como células são criadas, só muito recentemente é que descobrimos como eles morreram. Células morrem através de três principais mecanismos. A mais feia e menos elegante forma de morte celular é uma necrose, em que por causa de uma falta de comida ou alguma outra lesão tóxica, as células se abrem, liberando o seu conteúdo para os soros. Necrose, que ocorre em um coração transplantado, passando por rejeição, provoca uma ativação muito poderosa do sistema imunológico do corpo. Necrose, então, é a versão de celular de uma “morte ruim.”

A segunda forma de morte celular é autofagia, em que a célula ativa em si, transformando seus componentes defeituosos ou redundantes em nutrientes, que podem ser usados por outras células. Esta forma de morte celular ocorre quando o suprimento de alimentos é limitado, mas não inteiramente cortado, tais como na insuficiência cardíaca.

A forma mais sofisticada de morte celular, no entanto, é ao contrário dos outros dois tipos. Apoptose, uma palavra grega usada para descrever as folhas caindo, é uma forma programada de morte celular. Quando uma célula torna-se velho ou ruína define em, isso é cutucou, geralmente por sinalização moléculas, submeter-se a uma forma de auto de demolição controlada. Ao contrário em necrose, a célula não estourou, não imposto o sistema imunológico, mas dissolve-se em silêncio. Apoptose é a razão pela qual nossa medula óssea não pesa duas toneladas ou nossos intestinos não crescem indefinidamente.

Tão importante como apoptose é a morte, é essencial para a vida. Enquanto como seres humanos, muitas vezes consciente ou inconscientemente esperamos alcançar a imortalidade, imortalidade tem uma existência muito real no mundo celular — é chamado câncer. Na verdade, a maioria dos cânceres ocorrem por causa de defeitos na apoptose, e mais novas terapias de câncer são projetadas para permitir que a morte celular ocorrem como normalmente faria.

Em muitos aspectos, portanto, vida e morte em um nível celular são muito mais socialmente consciente do que como nós interface com estes fenómenos à escala humana. Para as células, o que é bom para o organismo é melhor para a célula. Embora as células são projetadas inteiramente para sobreviver, uma morte apropriada é fundamental para a sobrevivência do organismo, que em si tem que morrer de forma semelhante para o bem da sociedade e o ecossistema habita.

Nós, seres humanos passar grande parte de nossas vidas, negando a morte. Morte, no entanto, não é o inimigo. Se há um inimigo, é o medo que morte desperta. O medo da morte muitas vezes induz-na fazer escolhas que desafiam as limitações biológicas da nossa existência. Tais escolhas, muitas vezes, levam-nos para um destino que se assemelha mais a necrose, envolvendo a ativação fútil de inúmeros recursos eventualmente resultando em um resultado cataclísmico, ao invés de apoptose. Além disso, enquanto esperamos a desafiar nossa mortalidade, nossas células mostram a devastação que pode ocorrer para o organismo se sequer uma célula entre bilhões atinge a imortalidade.

Quando perguntei a Robert Horvitz, o Prêmio Nobel-ganhando biólogo no Instituto de tecnologia de Massachusetts, que fazia parte do grupo que descobriu apoptose, que lições podemos aprender com a morte celular, a resposta dele demonstrou exatamente porque falhamos em entender a morte no contexto de nossas vidas: “Somente uma vez antes alguém se aproximou de mim para discutir questões existenciais que me relaciono o que é conhecido sobre a morte de célula a existência humana.”

A questão para nós, então, é: o que é o equivalente humano da apoptose no contexto da nossa sociedade? Uma maneira de abordar essa questão é olhar para o que é o equivalente humano de necrose. Para mim, se um ser humano está no hospital com terapias intensivas, manutenção da vida como respiração artificial, nutrição ou diálise, sustentando-os com poucas chances de recuperar a função cerebral razoável, tal estado pode ser considerado necrose. Quase qualquer outra alternativa, se um morre no hospital tendo rescindido ressuscitação ou intubação (DNR/DNI), em casa com serviços de cuidados paliativos ou com o auxílio de prescrição de um médico, tem muito mais em comum com a apoptose.

Lutamos incessantemente responder a algumas das nossas perguntas mais cruciais, no entanto, de alguma forma nós não tentamos encontrá-los da maquinaria básica da nossa biologia. Apoptose representa uma visão pura da morte, como ocorre na natureza, e essa visão é algo que pode aspirar em nossa própria morte: uma célula morre nunca isoladamente, mas em uma visão clara dos seus pares; raramente morre por sua própria vontade; uma força maior que está em contacto com o organismo maior entende que quando uma célula é mais susceptível de prejudicar a si e aqueles ao seu redor por continuar. Apoptose representa o paradoxo final — para o organismo sobreviver, as células devem morrer, e eles devem morrer bem. “Há muitas doenças em que há pouca morte apoptotic”, disse Dr. Horvitz, “e nesses casos ele está ativando a apoptose que pode aumentar a longevidade”.

E, finalmente, uma célula também entende melhor do que nós, seres humanos as consequências de um superando é bem-vindo. Pois embora a humanidade aspira a alcançar a imortalidade, nossas células ensinam-nos que uma vida sem morte é o destino mais natural de todos.

Haider Javed Mara é fellow em medicina cardiovascular na Duke University Medical Center e autor de “morte moderna: como a medicina mudou o final da vida.”

xxxxxx

Traducao do Google

xxx

Havia tanta beleza a ser encontrada no impulso infinitesimal e puxe entre a vida ea morte dessas lâminas ilustradas que eu iria fantasiar sobre tê-los moldado e colocar-se em minha casa. No entanto, o mais eu estudava essas células, mais eu percebia que eles possam ter as respostas a um dos temas mais difíceis do nosso tempo.

Ao longo da nossa história, em especial recentemente, a raça humana tem olhou longe para responder a uma questão complexa – o que é uma boa morte? Com tantas tecnologias que sustentam a vida agora capaz de nos manter vivos quase indefinidamente, muitos acreditam que uma morte “natural” é uma boa. Com a tecnologia agora invadindo quase todos os aspectos de nossas vidas, o desejo de uma morte natural experiência espelhos tendências observadas na forma como desejam experimentar o nascimento, viagens e alimentos nos dias de hoje.

Quando nós imaginar uma morte natural, que evocam um homem ou uma mulher deitada na cama em casa, cercado pelos seus entes queridos. Tomando sua última respiração em sua própria cama, uma visão onipresente na literatura, foi o modus operandi para a morte nos tempos antigos. No livro “Atitudes ocidentais em direção à morte “, escreveu Philippe Ariès que a cena leito de morte foi “organizada pela própria pessoa morrendo, que presidiu e sabia seu protocolo” e que era uma cerimônia pública em que “era essencial que os pais , amigos e vizinhos estar presente. “Embora tais representações resplandecentes de morte continuam a ser difundido tanto na cultura literatura e pop moderna, eles são na sua maioria ficção na melhor das hipóteses.

Temos lutado incessantemente para responder a algumas das perguntas mais cruciais, mas de alguma forma nós não tentou encontrá-los na máquina de base de nossa biologia. Apoptose representa uma visão pura da morte como ocorre na natureza, e que a visão é algo que pode aspirar na nossa própria morte: Uma célula não morre nunca isoladamente, mas na visão clara de seus pares; raramente morre por sua própria vontade; uma força maior que está em contato com o organismo maior entende quando uma célula é mais susceptíveis de prejudicar a si mesmo e aqueles em torno dele, levando por diante. Apoptose representa um paradoxo – para o organismo para sobreviver, as células devem morrer, e eles devem morrer bem. “Existem muitas doenças em que há muito pouco a morte por apoptose”, disse Horvitz, “e nesses casos é ativar a apoptose que poderia aumentar a longevidade.”

E, finalmente, uma célula também compreende melhor do que nós, seres humanos fazem as consequências de superando sua bem-vindo. Para que a humanidade aspira a alcançar a imortalidade, as nossas células nos ensinam que uma vida sem a morte é o destino mais antinatural de todos.

Tags: ,