Archive for dezembro 11th, 2014

Quimica: E-book e Website a Pesquisar

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

ChemWiki: The Dynamic Chemistry E-textbook

http://chemwiki.ucdavis.edu/

Specularium: Nova Teoria Cosmológica para Pesquisar

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

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http://www.specularium.org/

Alergias: Misterioso Fenomeno para Matrix/DNA Pesquisar

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

Este artigo muito informativo pode iniciar a pesquisa:

Did Allergies Evolve To Save Your Life?

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/science-sushi/2013/10/24/allergies-evolve-save-life/#.VIoO_jHF_86

A Matrix/DNA E Divulgação ao Publico Adolescente – Redes Sociais

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

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Facebook added a lot more than 100 million month-to-month active customers last year. That suggests 757 million men and women now check out Facebook everyday (1.3 billion monthly!)

LinkedIn boasts an impressive 332 million customers and Twitter 284 million.

A Teenager’s View on Social Media

Written by an actual teen

I read technology articles quite often and see plenty of authors attempt to dissect or describe the teenage audience, especially in regards to social media. However, I have yet to see a teenager contribute their voice to this discussion. This is where I would like to provide my own humble opinion.

For transparency, I am a 19-year-old male attending The University of Texas at Austin. I am extremely interested in social media’s role in our society as well as how it is currently evolving. Thus, the views I provide here are my own, but do stem from observation of not only my own habits but my peers’ habits as well.

This article will not use any studies, data, sources, etc. This is because you can easily get that from any other technology news website and analyze from there. I’m here to provide a different view based off of my life in this “highly coveted” age bracket. That being said, I’m not an expert at this by a long shot and I’m sure there will be data that disproves some of the points I make, but this is just what I’ve noticed.

I think the best way to approach this would be to break it down by social media network and the observations/viewpoints I’ve gathered over the years.

Facebook

In short, many have nailed this on the head. It’s dead to us. Facebook is something we all got in middle school because it was cool but now is seen as an awkward family dinner party we can’t really leave. It’s weird and can even be annoying to have Facebook at times. That being said, if youdon’t have Facebook, that’s even more weird and annoying. Weird because of the social pressure behind the question, “Everyone has Facebook, why don’t you?” and annoying because you’ll have to answer that to just about everyone in classes you meet who makes an attempt to friend you or find you on there.

Facebook is often used by us mainly for its group functionality. I know plenty of classmates who only go on Facebook to check the groups they are part of and then quickly log off. In this part Facebook shines—groups do not have the same complicated algorithms behind them that the Newsfeed does. It is very easy to just see the new information posted on the group without having to sift through tons of posts and advertising you don’t really care about.

Messaging on Facebook is also extremely popular among our age group, mainly because they provide the means to talk to those people who you weren’t really comfortable with asking for their number but comfortable enough to send them a friend request.

Facebook is often the jumping-off point for many people to try to find you online, simply because everyone around us has it. If I met you one time at some party, I’m not going to try to check Twitter or Instagram to find out who you are. Instead, many opt for the ease of Facebook and the powerful search functionality that gives you results of people who you actually have a chance of knowing (unlike Instagram, whose search functionality, although it improved slightly in the last update, leaves much to be desired).

Instagram

Instagram is by far the most used social media outlet for my age group. Please note the verbiage there—it is the most used social media outlet. Meaning, although the most people are on Facebook, we actually post stuff on Instagram. It’s always fascinating to me to see a friend with 1500 friends on Facebook only get 25 likes on a photo yet on Instagram (where she has 800 followers) she gets 253. I have a few ideas as to why this could happen:

  • I’m not terrified whenever I like something on Instagram that it will show up in someone’s Newsfeed and they’ll either screenshot that I liked it or reference it later. The same goes for commenting.
  • I am not as pressured to follow someone back on Instagram, meaning my feed is normally comprised of content I actually want to see. That being said, I will come back and scroll through an application that has content I enjoy rather than one where I have to find the occasional diamond in the rough.
  • The content on Instagram is usually of higher quality. People take time to edit their photos with filters, use different brightness/contrast settings (it’s even one of the steps to posting a photo), etc., to make the pictures look the best they possibly can. This means the content on Instagram is normally “better” (photo-wise), so I am more likely to go back to the application.
  • Instagram hasn’t been flooded with the older generation yet (noteveryone has an Instagram) meaning it’s “hip” and “cool” to the younger crowd. However, it is popular enough that if you have a smartphone it’s almost unheard of for you not to have Instagram, if not to take pictures, but to at least tag people in photos.
  • Another point: tagging. I don’t have to constantly check Instagram to make sure I wasn’t tagged in any awkward or bad photos. That’s becauseyou can’t easily see them in your feed, making the whole experience seem way more private. Am I looking weird in a photo you posted? Who cares—I can just delete the tag if I really am that upset about it without fear that my friends from another social circle (who don’t follow you) will get to it first. I know Facebook has the ability to let you check every single photo tagged of you before it appears on your profile, but many people I know do not have that enabled or know it even exists.
  • People do not post 10000 times a day on Instagram. Many are much more polite about posting, either doing once a day, a few times a week, etc. This means that there isn’t a constant flow of content being shoved down my throat every time I open the application, and it is possible to be “caught up” with my Instagram feed.
  • There are no links on Instagram, meaning I’m not being constantly spammed by the same advertisement, horrible gossip news article, or Buzzfeed listicle about the “28 Ingenious Things For Your Dog You Had No Idea You Needed”

Those are some reasons why many people my age tend to use Instagram more than they do Facebook. Everything about the application makes it less commercialized and more focused on the content, meaning more teens are inclined to visit it. When we do visit the application it is a much more pleasant experience so we are more inclined to Like and interact with the posts more. This increases our interaction with the application, meaning we will use it more, etc.

Facebook gets all of the photos we took — the good, the bad, etc—while Instagram just gets the one that really summed up the event we went to. It is much more selective, and honestly people spend more time on the captions to make them relevant/funny. On Facebook we just throw up everything we got so people can tag each other and show our family members that we’re still alive.

Many of those younger than me (10–16 years old) who I’ve talked to about this matter don’t even have a Facebook — Instagram is all that they need.

Twitter

To be honest, a lot of us simply do not understand the point of Twitter. There is always a core group at every school that uses it very religiously to tweet and another group that uses it to simply watch or retweet, but besides that many don’t use it. It also isn’t extremely easy to find friends on the site and many just use it to complain about school in a setting where their parents/family members (not necessarily employers) are likely not to see it.

Twitter is a place to follow/be followed by a bunch of random strangers, yet still have your identity be attached to it (this distinction will be important later on). Your tweets are also easily searchable on Twitter which is good but not good if you want to be yourself and not have it follow you around when you’re trying to land a job. Thus, to others Twitter is used like Facebook—you post with the assumption that your employer will see it one day.

There are then three main groups of Twitter users: the ones who use it to complain/express themselves, the ones who tweet with the assumption that their prospective employer will eventually see whatever they are saying, and the ones who simply look at other Tweets and do the occasional RT.

Snapchat

Snapchat is quickly becoming the most used social media network, especially with the advent of My Story. If I could break down a party for you in social media terms, here’s how it would pan out:

  • You post yourself getting ready for the party, going to the party, having fun at the party, leaving at the end of the party, and waking up the morning after the party on Snapchat.
  • On Facebook you post the cute, posed pictures you took with your friends at the party with a few candids (definitely no alcohol in these photos).
  • On Instagram you pick the cutest one of the bunch to post to your network.

Snapchat is where we can really be ourselves while being attached to our social identity. Without the constant social pressure of a follower count or Facebook friends, I am not constantly having these random people shoved in front of me. Instead, Snapchat is a somewhat intimate network of friends who I don’t care if they see me at a party having fun.

On no other social network (besides Twitter possibly) is it acceptable post an “I’m soooo bored” photo besides Snapchat. There aren’t likes you have to worry about or comments—it’s all taken away. Snapchat has a lot less social pressure attached to it compared to every other popular social media network out there. This is what makes it so addicting and liberating. If I don’t get any likes on my Instagram photo or Facebook post within 15 minutes you can sure bet I’ll delete it. Snapchat isn’t like that at all and really focuses on creating the Story of a day in your life, not some filtered/altered/handpicked highlight. It’s the real you.

Another quick aside about Snapchat—I only know a handful of people (myself included) that believe Snapchat does delete your photos. Everyone else I know believes that Snapchat has some secret database somewhere with all of your photos on it. While I will save that debate for another day, it is safe to say that when photos are “leaked” or when there’s controversy about security on the app, we honestly do not really care. We aren’t sending pictures of our Social Security Cards here, we’re sending selfies and photos with us having 5 chins.

Tumblr

Remember in the section on Twitter I said, “Twitter is also a place to follow/be followed by a bunch of random strangers, yet still have your identity be attached to it”? Tumblr is a place to follow/be followed by a bunch of random strangers, yet not have your identity be attached to it. Tumblr is like a secret society that everyone is in, but no one talks about. Tumblr is where you are your true self and surround yourself (through who you follow) with people who have similar interests. It’s often seen as a “judgment-free zone” where, due to the lack of identity on the site, you can really be who you want to be. The only Tumblr URLs I know of people in real life are my close friends and vice versa.

Plus, it’s simple in Tumblr to just change your URL if anyone finds you. Your name isn’t attached to that profile at all so without that URL it is pretty difficult to find you again, especially for the typical parent snooping around. This really helps make the site a place where people can post and support others posts. There is a lot of interaction on this website in the form of reblogs because people just simply have feeds of only things they care about (and are then more likely to support with a like/reblog). I wouldn’t say a lot of “socializing” — at least in the way we’ve defined it in our social media society—occurs on the site, but people can really easily meet others worldwide who hold similar interests. This makes it a very alluring site to join for many teenagers, even just to make new friends.

Yik Yak

Yik Yak is a rather new contender, however, a ton of friends in college have the application. It has gotten to be so addicting because it focuses solely on the content of your posts—there are no followers, no profiles, nothing. Whatever is funny/relevant is at the top and everything else is at the bottom, whether Kanye West is the one who is writing it or some random kid who never talks in class.

There’s an advertisement I see often on Twitter for Yik Yak that says something along the lines of “Everyone’s on it before class starts.” I can 100% reaffirm that this is true. And everyone’s on it during class, talking about the class they are in. And everyone’s on it after class to find out what else is going on around campus.

While it hasn’t reached the popularity of the other networks, Yik Yak is a powerful contender that people actually use. Often I see people post about the fight for anonymity with other applications such as Secret. I can tell you that I do not know a single person in my network who uses that application. People reference Yaks all the time with each other or send screenshots, I have yet to ever hear of a hot post on Secret that everyone’s talking about.

A negative to Yik Yak, however, is how unused the application is whenever there is a school holiday. Yik Yak is only as good as the 10 mile radius around you, so if you are in an area with a low population of Yik Yak users, you won’t really be using the application much. The same can’t be said for the other social media sites on this list.

Medium

Many of my peers look for platforms to begin a writing blog that they can share with their friends and family. When I hear my friends say this, they automatically think of creating a WordPress site. For some reason, WordPress seems like the more “sophisticated” website to begin a blog. Others who have had experience with Tumblr will choose to open up a separate blog on there, one that is not connected to their “personal” blog on the platform.

However, once I have introduced Medium to those my age, I have never seen them turn back in terms of a platform to publish a blog.

What Medium does right is the “recommend” function. This is unseen on WordPress (besides the typical website sharing buttons) and is really what makes Medium a community, not just a bunch of individual sites. Having a simple “Follow” system also makes it so that you come back to Medium even if you aren’t looking to write a blog. Medium also has an emphasis on commenting right next to the text (as opposed to a lengthy comment section at the bottom).

Medium’s only challenge is becoming known to the teenage audience. The layout of the site as well as the content is all there, what is needed is just the recognition of our age group. I feel that over time as more teenagers begin to discover Medium, many of my peers will begin blogging here.

The Others

Here are other social media networks that some teens use but that don’t really require a full-length discussion:

  • LinkedIn — We have to get it, so we got it. Many wait until college to get this (as they probably should, it isn’t for this demographic anyways).
  • Pinterest—It’s mainly female-dominated and is for those who have an artsy/hipster focus. Not too many people talk about it.
  • Kik—It’s a messaging application that is mainly used for messaging people on Twitter I guess? I don’t know anyone who uses it. The only time I ever hear this application is for the joke, “Aye you got Kik?”, normally seen as someone trying to “spit game” to attract a partner. It’s really difficult for me to describe it here but it isn’t super relevant.
  • WhatsApp—You download it when you go abroad, you use it there for a bit before going back to iMessage and Facebook Messenger, then you delete it. I know tons of people who use it to communicate with friends they made abroad, but I feel like Messenger is beginning to overshadow it. For international students, however, WhatsApp is a pivotal tool that I’ve heard is truly useful.
  • GroupMe—By far the most used group messaging application in college. Everyone has one, uses it and loves it. GIF support, the ability to “like” others messages, even trivial things such as being able to change your name between group chats all make this both a useful and enjoyable application. GroupMe also works for literally any phone or device…it is on desktop, iPhone, Android, and can work over text as well for those who may not have a smartphone.

Blog e Website: Lições para Motivação e Disciplina

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

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The Truth About Going Viral

What I Did After 1 Million People Visited My Blog

https://medium.com/@jeffgoins/the-truth-about-going-viral-2fc205db6c97

Everyone wants to be famous for something. We all want to do something epic, something worth remembering. But maybe fame isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. In fact, I have good reason to believe that it’s not.

An archived post on my blog recently caught some traction and went viral, sending over a million people to my website in a week. It’s causing me to rethink why I do my work and whether or not artists should chase audiences.

Here’s what happened:

  1. An article about traveling while you’re young was picked up randomly by a student leader in Singapore one year after I published it.
  2. That person shared it on Facebook with a travel group he led on campus.
  3. Each person in the group shared this with their respective networks, and it spread to similar student groups in the Philippines and Malaysia.
  4. In about 24 hours, the post had made it all the way around the world, finishing its tour in Brazil.

The first time this happened, 0ver 150,000 people visited the blog. The second time, it was about half that amount. And then the third time, it reach over 1 million visitors and was shared via Facebook over 250,000 times — all in about a week. Pretty crazy.

But here’s the craziest part: none of that matters.

The confusion of virality

After the article when viral, I was confused and anxious.

What did this mean? Should I change what I write about, focusing more on this topic of travel? Should I try to keep as many of those visitors as possible? And what would I do when Monday rolled around, and I had to start blogging again?

The next week, I hit the old grindstone again, and the Internet had already forgotten about me. My traffic spike had mellowed out, and I was back to zero, forced to earn people’s attention all over again.

I tried to drag out the success, of course, tried to prolong that temporary feeling of fulfillment that fame brings. But for some reason, it wasn’t enough. And through the process, I learned something:

Every week I go back to zero. And so do you.

No single creative success can be sustained. That’s why you can’t create solely for profit or praise.In the end, the thrill never lasts. If you want to be an artist, there has to be something more than fame that sustains you.

Just ask Elizabeth Gilbert

Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert was an inexplicable, runaway success. After she wrote the book and it raced up the bestsellers lists, people asked her a cruel question:

“Aren’t you afraid you’re never going to be able to top that?”

The answer, not surprisingly, was: Yes. She worried she’d never be able to write another book that achieved such success. In an amazing TED Talk, she said, “It’s exceedingly likely that my greatest success is behind me.”

This worry held her back, caused her to hesitate and wait years before writing and publishing another book. But eventually she did. And how she did it was unique. Courageous, even.

She went to work, anyway. She treated her life’s work as just that — a job.She started believing in the idea of a Muse, a spirit that indwells artists. She resigned to a more mystical, creative process, and began to understand that “success” wasn’t up to her.

No, her job was to show up.

We must do the same

No matter how amazing you are today, you have to get up and put the hours in tomorrow. And the next day. And so on.

Because that thing inside of you that causes you to create already forgot yesterday’s successes, it’s hungry. And if you don’t feed it something new, it will eat you alive.

That, my friends, is why artists kill themselves, why they get depressed after a monumental success and never create anything again. After going big with some huge, mega success that plummets them into instant stardom, they seemingly have nowhere left to go.

But that isn’t why they got into the game in the first place. And it’s not why you and I are in it, either. At least, I hope not.

Fame is not enough

Doing creative work for mass consumption is not fulfilling. Sure, it’s a nice byproduct, but it can’t be the focus.

This is why I write (and often) every day. Not for the fans and followers. But for me. Because if I do not, I feel like something is missing. The accolades never seem to completely satisfy. Only creating can fulfill you after the fanfare fades.

So do something creative today. Scribble a note in your notebook. Snap a photo. Bang out a few chords on the guitar. Hit “publish” on that blog post you’ve been stalling to write.

Show up and do your work.

Whatever you do, please, don’t live in the past. And don’t wait for the future. Now is all you have. So, artist, create. It’s what you were made to do.

A version of this article originally appeared on goinswriter.com.


Jeff Goins is a writer, blogger, and speaker who regularly talks about how to live a life worth writing about. He is the author of three books. For thoughts on writing and life, you can join his free newsletter.

Asteróides-Pipas Transportaram a Água Para o Planeta Terra?! Porque não Trouxeram Vinho e Cachaça Tambem?

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

É cada uma! Um considerado sério jornal como o The Wall Street Journal publicou este artigo e a minha opinião de que as escolas e universidades estão deixando os alunos totalmente aloprados formando estes cientistas aloprados não poderia me evitar postar a minha opinião seguinte no jornal:

Veja link:

Rosetta Data Support View That Asteroids Brought Water to Earth

http://www.wsj.com/articles/rosetta-mission-data-support-view-asteroids-brought-water-to-earth-1418238237

Direct measurements of the water contained on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by the Rosetta spacecraft support the view that it was asteroids that brought most of the water to the early Earth. The findings undermine a view that  favored comets as the source of Earth’s water. Gautam Naik reports.

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Louis Morelli
Louis Morelli – Dec, 11, 2014

Schools are teaching a wrong model for astronomic systems formation and this is serious because the believe in any world view is the foundations for a moral code, some humans behaviors and prejudices the mind’s evolution. A “theoretical” model is being told to be scientifically proved, as you can see inn the shollars texts.

This model suggests that Earth and any other planet next to the Sun could not have this big quantity of water, so, what are they waiting for telling the thru and searching another more accurate model?

Like Matrix/DNA Theory is suggesting a different model that predicts this water and every day is reinforced by space new data. We are doing a disservice to our children selling theories as if they were already proved by data. All prior civilizations broke down due were built upon wrong interpretations of this natural world and we are repeating the bad course, our future generations and maybe we that are alive today will pay the hard price.

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The theoretical current model for astronomic systems formations is wrong but the academic staff does not want to recognize it. Then, non-rational hypothesis like this one are necessary for fitting into the model. We are watching everyday new real data and the experts words: “this was not predicted by the model, or “this is exception because does not fit the known formation process”, etc.

Comets are not formed by the Kuiper Belt and are not made up of ice, dust and rocky material, only. Comets originates from giant volcanoes of giant gaseous old planets and their nucleus are composed by volcanic magma. Planets are not formed by isolated and separated dust at peripheral nebular regions, but by the same central vortex that formed the star, so, planets were covered by ice at their formation and the stars heat evaporated or transformed into water this surface ice… as predicted by a more rational astronomic model called “Matrix/DNA Theory”. Both are theoretical models very different, but also the academic staff does not want to recognize any others model.

Musica Elogiada no Exterior Precisa Tradução para Português

quinta-feira, dezembro 11th, 2014

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Meu comentario postado no video:

Louis Charles Morelli – Dec, 11, 2014

Please, someone could write the letters of this song here? I can’t understand talked English but can understand written English. And I will translate it to Portuguese, posting it here for Brazilians, Portugueses and others to understand it. Thanks a lot…

See the video:

Chris Rice -Questions for Heaven

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDrNroBGHE4#t=50

Ok, a resposta veio:

Feel the sun in my eyes Swat that clumsy fly Woke me up from a dream about Heaven Smellin’ coffee downstairs Yawn a quick little prayer And get up at a quarter to seven Mirror catches my stare Got some nice pillow hair And I smile all the way to the bathroom Scratch my whiskery chin Now my cranium swims With questions I can’t wait to ask You …Like why did You bother with so many stars? Do You ever play tricks on the angels? And what happened to all of those dinosaurs? Where’s the Garden of Eden? And what causes de ja vu? I guess in Heaven I’ll learn I’ll be waiting my turn To ask about quasars and feathers I hope the line isn’t long I hope Your patience is strong It’s a good thing forever’s forever Do our jokes make You laugh? What’s Your favorite cartoon? Can you tell me what’s out past the edges? And what about UFOs, taste buds, and tornados? Why do we dream? Oh, and what causes de ja vu? Time to call it a day Time to turn off my brain It’s already half past eleven Reach to turn out the light And close my sleepy eyes And save up the questions for Heaven I’ll save all the questions for Heaven I’m saving up questions for Heaven